Aquidneck Island

Finding Pollution Hot Spots in Local Watersheds

During the past summer, I had the awesome opportunity to work with Simona Trandafir, Emi Uchida, and Todd Guilfoos of URI’s Department of Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (ENRE) for the North East Water Resources Network (NEWRnet ) EPSCoR research project funded by the National Science Foundation. Other universities involved in NEWRnet are Salve Regina University, University of Vermont, and University of Delaware. The research focused total maximum daily loads (TMDL) of freshwater watersheds. Researchers chose three types of watersheds – urban, agricultural, and forest – to figure out what kind of land use affected the water quality. ENRE’s part of the research was split into two parts: one to develop a computer simulation experiment of stakeholder’s decision-making related to water quality, and then to actually go out in the field to find hot spots of pollution and talk to stakeholders.

Interns

Before I could even start my internship at the university, I was on a train with fellow interns from URI and Salve Regina to Delaware for a convention where we met thirteen other interns, each with his or her own project. Some were going to take water samples by hand while others were going to set up sensors in the steams and a few were going to create the computer simulation experiments. My project for the summer was to go out in the field and find hot spots of water pollution within the watersheds. While in Delaware I was able to make friends while learning about TMDLs and the NEWRnet mission. We were given tours of water treatment facilities in Wilmington, Delaware and brought to Delaware’s urban and forest watersheds. Our days were 8am-5pm, but once we were done we were able to explore the restaurants around the university and get to know the people we would be working with for the summer. On our last full day we even went to a rope and zip-lining course!

Drinking water

Once I got back to Rhode Island, the rest of the URI and Salve Regina team and I were given a tour of Bailey’s Brook and Maidford River Watersheds on Aquidneck Island in Middletown, Rhode Island. Bailey’s Brook is the urban watershed and Maidford River is the agricultural watershed. Since Aquidneck Island does not have much forest, the pristine forest watershed for Rhode Island is the Scituate Reservoir Watershed. Once I had an idea of where the watersheds were located, I began researching through secondary sources policies in place to protect the water, what types of pollutants the town of Middletown was most concerned with, and potential hot spots of water pollution. I met with Simona once a week to discuss my findings and figure out where I needed to go from there. Once I had a better understanding of TMDLs, I contacted the Town Planner of Middletown, various people from Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management and Aquidneck Land Trust to try to find out what their future plans were, if any.

Before my internship I was not fully aware that there is still pollution in our drinking water. On top of this new knowledge, I also gained valuable skills such as interviewing and researching and developing further questions to continue a research project that extends beyond classroom deadlines. Walking into this internship I had no idea what to expect, but I encourage all ENRE majors to have one under their belts before graduation. Internships are great opportunities to learn something new, gain valuable skills, and meet new people along the way.

By: Kellie Brown

December 11th, 2014